Treat eczema naturally with PEA cream and PEA supplement

Treat eczema naturally with PEA cream and PEA supplement

Eczema, itching and skin diseases are terrible diseases. People do not understand, think it is contagious, they look at you in a weird way, you do not like to go to a swimming pool, and the itchy, scaly skin and medicines are no fun either. Now there is finally a natural alternative, based on the supplement PEA and a cream containing the endogenous analgesic and itching-soothing substance palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Always choose for a PEA product with the GRAS certificate.

 

Deficits of PEA in the skin in the event of chronic damage

PEA: a protective molecule in the skin

The logic behind using PEA in the occurrence of eczema and skin damage, for instance caused by radiotherapy during cancer treatments, too much sunlight or chronic inflammation, is that the skin contains not enough of the natural protective substance PEA. Recently, it was also shown that the eczematic skin itself tries to produce more of the protective substance PEA. [1] PEA then modulates the excessive and chronic inflammation in the skin. [1] But maybe we should start with what an American dermatologist says about the results of PEA cream with eczema:

An open-label, international study observed 2,456 people, aged 2-70 years, with mild to moderate atopy treated with adjunctive PEA cream. Results were presented as a poster by Dr. B. Eberien-Koeing and associates at the 2006 annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. They assessed itching, erythema, scaling, dryness, lichenification, and excoriation. “With PEA cream everything significantly improved or was eliminated,” Dr. Smith said.

In the US, a cream containing PEA is on the market holding the government medical indication: ‘Protection against cancer radiotherapy’. PEA is a molecule produced by the skin itself, but which is insufficiently produced at times of serious damage and chronic inflammations. To administer extra PEA through tablets and cream can provide a solution. More about this further on. [3][4]

 

Children, itching and eczema

Children can also suffer a lot from eczema, and they often cause damage by scratching the itchy parts. The image shows a typical example of a child with eczema; both images show the same child.

Children with eczema

The most commonly used medicine against eczema (and itching) is based on corticosteroids, which cause many unpleasant side effects. That also applies to the treatment of the (itching) atopic eczema. Also dialysis patients can suffer from a red, inflamed skin, and a lot of itching. The same goes for people treated with cancer radiotherapy, or children with diaper eczema. For all of these patients, there is now a natural alternative in form of a cream. So no need to unwrap corticosteroids. PEA cream contains the pain relieving, itching-soothing, and anti-inflammatory natural substance palmitoylethanolamide. A number of studies have been carried out since 2005, which clearly show that PEA very can be useful in skin diseases that involve itching, redness, eczema, damage and pain. [5]

Now there is a new method that follows the natural process in treating eczema and itching. [6]] A method based on a natural anti-inflammatory and itching-reducing substance, the supplement palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in combination with a PEA cream.

Treatment of eczema with palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and PEA containing cream

Children with eczema

PEA creams already existed before(since 2005), but the concentration of PEA in these creams, however, was very low. The producer of PEA has now developed a new cream through a patented process, and this cream contains much more PEA than the older ones, approximately 5 times more. Especially when used together with the PEA capsules, this can be very useful for the treatment of eczema. Without the appearance of any side effects.

PEA is a greasy bioactive substance which the skin does not produce enough in the occurrence of eczema. The role of PEA in the skin is to protect and repair the skin, or to restore the skin’s balance at times of unwelcome infections (like eczema). Chronic infections (and redness) are the result of not enough PEA in the skin. Interesting is that several recent text books 2013 – Moisturizers for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis An overview  – about dermatology mention PEA as an exceptional skin protecting substance (see below). Also experiments with skin disorders show the protective effect of PEA. [7]

PEA cream: an asset against pain in general, vaginal pain, severe itching and radiation damage

The PEA in cream can be useful for different diseases:

  1. Small fibre neuropathic pain
  2. Radiation damage of the skin
  3. Atopic eczema
  4. Diaper eczema babies
  5. Child eczema
  6. Severe itching caused by kidney function disorders (uremic pruritus)
  7. Accelerated aging and damage to the skin, e.g. caused by light
  8. Chronic inflammation of the skin
  9. Vaginal pains

Anti-inflammatory effect of PEA cream in case of child eczema: a good alternative for corticosteroid cream

 

PEA cream

The special advantage of PEA cream is that the cell protecting effect of PEA combined with the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect makes the cream largely usable. The problem with child eczema, for instance, is that there are only corticosteroid ointments to suppress the eczema. With PEA cream being available, there is a good alternative to treat this eczema, a kind of chronic inflammation of the skin. The PEA cream has no unpleasant side effects as you will find in corticosteroid creams (atrophy and undermining of the skin in chronic use). A large study with more than 2,000 patients showed that a cream containing PEA was very useful against the so-called atopic eczema, and that there were no side effects (see below). More than 900 patients from the target group were children! These children showed an average improvement of 60% in their eczema complaints after having used the cream containing PEA.

 

PEA cream with atopic dermatitis: recommendations by USA dermatologists

The conclusion of the dermatologists was that cream with PEA significantly reduced the need of corticosteroid ointments, as well as the symptoms of the eczema:

This study demonstrates substantial relief of objective and subjective symptoms of atopic eczema after regular skin care with the study cream over a period of 38 days. The requirement for treatment with topical corticosteroids was reduced in a substantial proportion of participants, which has potentially important pharmacoeconomic implications in the management of atopic eczema.

Interesting is that the same positive effects of PEA are reported with eczema in animals. [8][9]

 

Value of PEA cream with uremic dermatitis; itching with dialysis patients

Beside eczema, there are other causes for itching, redness and irritation of the skin. Patients with kidney function disorders often suffer from serious skin disorders and itching. In an article about ‘The Efficacy and Tolerance of the Cream Containing Structured Physiological Lipids with palmitoylethanolamide in the Treatment of Uremic Pruritus’ it is shown that a cream which contains PEA can reduce this itching and improve the skin condition. The article can be found under the following link: 2005-Efficacy and Tolerance of the Cream Containing Structured Physiological Lipids with Endocannabinoids in the Treatment of Uremic Pruritus.

People following a dialysis treatment suffer from itching that is caused by a too high level of urea in the blood (urea is a breakdown product of protein). This is also called uremic itching. The itching may also be caused by a too high level of phosphate content or a too low level of ferritin content (an iron-like substance that produces red blood cells). In case of itching, it must first be determined whether the itching is caused by the accumulation of waste or that there is another cause. In some cases a treatment might provide a solution; sometimes people have benefit from general tips against itching. In general, itching was often not well treated or could not be treated at all and remained a nuisance. But fortunately, there is now an alternative that can be tried out, PEA cream.

 

Other methods to reduce itchiness in kidney dialysis patients

In addition to PEA cream, following means can reduce itchiness:

-Optimize urea, phosphate, and ferritin content.

-PEA capsules against itching (and pain); PEA capsules belong to the group of supplements and are available without prescription.

-Prescription medication against itching for allergy sufferers, the so-called antihistamines. Because itching in dialysis patients is not caused by an allergy, results often are disappointing. They do give result sometimes, as it are soothing products and the itching can be better tolerated. Antihistamines, unfortunately, can lead to drowsiness and apathy.

-Treatment with erythropoietin (EPO). This product is used against anaemia. If epo is only prescribed against itching, it becomes a very expensive treatment.

-Light therapy with ultraviolet B, also called UVB-treatment (another light treatment, the UVA-treatment, gives no result).

-Some dialysis patients also have benefit from a special body milk, which can be obtained with a doctor‘s prescription.

There has been no research to the effects of PEA cream in case of hepatic pruritus (itching caused by liver disorder, but in view of the experiences gained in other itchy skin disorders, it seems certainly useful to do this. There are creams against damage caused by sunlight, and these indicate the following properties of PEA:

Uses or PEA: Helps relieve itch and redness. Helps relieve sunburn. Physiological complex with antioxidant properties which scavenges free radicals associated with pre-mature aging.

PEA seems to be offering a multitude of protective and repairing properties when administered in cream on a damaged or diseased skin, without significant side effects. [10][11][6][13]

Further resources about PEA’s skin protection

Eberlein B1, Eicke C, Reinhardt HW, Ring J. Adjuvant treatment of atopic eczema: assessment of an emollient containing N-palmitoylethanolamine (ATOPA study). J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008 Jan;22(1):73-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2007.02351.x.

Kircik L. A nonsteroidal lamellar matrix cream containing palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2010 Apr;9(4):334-8.

Del Rosso JQ. Use of a Palmitoylethanolamide-Containing Nonsteroidal Cream for Treating Atopic Dermatitis: Impact on the Duration of Response and Time Between Flares. Cosmet Dermatol. 2007;20:208-211. PEA cream in atopic dermititis

Jacek C. Szepietowski et al. Efficacy and Tolerance of the Cream Containing Struc- tured Physiological Lipids with Endocannabinoids in the Treatment of Uremic Pruritus: A Preliminary Study: Acta Dermatovenerol Croat 2005;13(2):97-103

Joseph Jorizzo. THE PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE FAMILY: A NEW TREATMENT CHOICE FOR ATOPIC DERMATITIS? MARCH 2005, J AM ACAD DERMATOL P729.

Simpson EL (2010) Atopic dermatitis: a review of topical treatment options. Curr Med Res Opin 26:633-640.

Wohlrab, J J. A single centre, investigator-blind, randomized, intra-individual, parallel-side clinical study to investigate the barrier functionality (restoration of normal functional conditions) of topically applied WO105, WO154 and WO155 in healthy volunteers. 2007.

Casciello C., Esposito M., Mazzotta A., Papoutsaki M., Chimenti S.: Efficacia e tollerabilità di un nuovo preparato topico a base di palmitoiletanolamide nel trattamento della psoriasi volgare di grado lieve – 3° CONGRESSO NAZIONALE UNIFICATO DI DERMATOLOGIA E VENEREOLOGIA, 2007

J Clinical and aestetical dermatology, june 2014

Book: Atopic Dermatitis and Eczematous Disorders by Donald Rudikoff,Steven R Cohen,Noah Scheinfeld

Book: Evidence-Based Dermatology by Michael Bigby,Andrew Herxheimer,Luigi Naldi,Berthold Rzany,Robert Dellavalle,Yuping Ran,Masutaka Furue, 2014

 

References

[1] Abramo F, Campora L, Albanese F, della Valle MF, Cristino L, Petrosino S, Di Marzo V, Miragliotta V1. | Increased levels of palmitoylethanolamide and other bioactive lipid mediators and enhanced local mast cell proliferation in canine atopic dermatitis. | BMC Vet Res. | 2014 Jan 14;10:21. doi: 10.1186/1746-6148-10-21.

[2] Abramo F, Campora L, Albanese F, della Valle MF, Cristino L, Petrosino S, Di Marzo V, Miragliotta V1. | Increased levels of palmitoylethanolamide and other bioactive lipid mediators and enhanced local mast cell proliferation in canine atopic dermatitis. | BMC Vet Res. | 2014 Jan 14;10:21. doi: 10.1186/1746-6148-10-21.

[3] Wolf R1, Parish LC. | Barrier-repair prescription moisturizers: do we really need them? Facts and controversies. | Clin Dermatol. | 2013 Nov-Dec;31(6):787-91. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2013.05.018.

[4] Eberlein B, Eicke C, Reinhardt HW, Ring J. | Adjuvant treatment of atopic eczema: assessment of an emollient containing N-palmitoylethanolamine (ATOPA study). | J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. | 2008 Jan;22(1):73-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2007.02351.x.

[5] Kircik L. | A nonsteroidal lamellar matrix cream containing palmitoylethanolamide for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. | J Drugs Dermatol. | 2010 Apr;9(4):334-8.

[6] Abramovits W1, Perlmutter A. | Steroids versus other immune modulators in the management of allergic dermatoses. | Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. | 2006 Oct;6(5):345-54.

[7] Petrosino S, Cristino L, Karsak M, Gaffal E, Ueda N, Tüting T, Bisogno T, De Filippis D, D’Amico A, Saturnino C, Orlando P, Zimmer A, Iuvone T, Di Marzo V. | Protective role of palmitoylethanolamide in contact allergic dermatitis. | Allergy. | 2010 Jun 1;65(6):698-711. doi: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02254 viagra in usa.x. Epub 2009 Nov 11.

[8] Cerrato S1, Brazis P, Della Valle MF, Miolo A, Petrosino S, Di Marzo V, Puigdemont A. | Effects of palmitoylethanolamide on the cutaneous allergic inflammatory response in Ascaris hypersensitive Beagle dogs. | Vet J. | 2012 Mar;191(3):377-82. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2011.04.002. Epub 2011 May 20.

[9] Cerrato S1, Brazis P, della Valle MF, Miolo A, Puigdemont A. | Effects of palmitoylethanolamide on immunologically induced histamine, PGD2 and TNFalpha release from canine skin mast cells. | Vet Immunol Immunopathol. | 2010 Jan 15;133(1):9-15. doi: 10.1016/j.vetimm.2009.06.011. Epub 2009 Jun 27.

[10] Garcia BD1, Goldman MP, Gold MH. | Comparison of pre- and/or postphotodynamic therapy and intense pulsed light treatment protocols for the reduction of postprocedure-associated symptoms and enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. | J Drugs Dermatol. | 2007 Sep;6(9):924-8.

[11] Kemeny L1, Koreck A, Kis K, Kenderessy-Szabo A, Bodai L, Cimpean A, Paunescu V, Raica M, Ghyczy M. | Endogenous phospholipid metabolite containing topical product inhibits ultraviolet light-induced inflammation and DNA damage in human skin. | Skin Pharmacol Physiol. | 2007;20(3):155-61. Epub 2007 Jan 17.

[12] Abramovits W1, Perlmutter A. | Steroids versus other immune modulators in the management of allergic dermatoses. | Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. | 2006 Oct;6(5):345-54.

[13] Szepietowski JC1, Szepietowski T, Reich A. | Efficacy and tolerance of the cream containing structured physiological lipids with endocannabinoids in the treatment of uremic pruritus: a preliminary study. | Acta Dermatovenerol Croat. | 2005;13(2):97-103.